Call us Today! 302.654.9444 | helpinghands.center@yahoo.com

“Can I sit at your table,?” No, you cannot. We don’t even like you, and if you don’t move, you will be sorry.” This type of aggression and intimidation is the beginnings of what is known as bullying activities.

No Bullyiing Image.jpgBullying is defined is defined as the repeated psychological or physical oppression of an individual with limited power by a more powerful person or group of people. Bullying can take place directly (in person) or indirectly (online or through other individuals-nobullying.com) It is a hot topic and the center of growing debates, especially with the newest bullying tactic referred to as “cyberbullying.” The nation on a whole, has put “no tolerance” policies in place at all schools. Yet the problem is still growing and so are the stats, especially at the middle school level. NCES(National Center for Education Stats) reports every year over 3.2 million students are bullied and approximately 160,000 students skip school each day because of bullying. Additionally, 75% of school gun related violence incidents have been linked to bullying; repeated bullying accounts for 10% of school dropouts; 56% of students have observed some type of bullying and over ⅔ of students believe school staff does not handle bullying well. It is imperative that together, we interrupt this aggressive behavior at its inception and give young people the tools needed to overcome this unacceptable conduct for both the perpetrator and the victim. Bullying is not and should not be a normal part of adolescent behavior and is fittingly, now considered to be a more serious public health challenge with short and long term consequences. Bullying can affect everyone; those who are bullied, those who bully and even the bystanders who witness bullying. Bullying is linked to many negative outcomes, including impacts on mental health, substance abuse, and tragically the cause of many suicide and suicide attempts. More than 1200 children ages 9 - 13 participated in a study @ Duke University to determine long term effects of bullying; the victim, the perpetrator and even the perpetrator becoming a victim of bullying (they are referred to as bully-victims as power imbalances can change over time and in different situations, even if they involve the same people). The outcomes showed that regardless of the childhood homelife, both the victim and the bully had these long term effects: Former bullies are more likely to exhibit anti-social behaviors and mood disorders; former bullies who also became bullied are more likely to suffer from anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts. Victims of bullying have more anxiety disorders, depression and self esteem issues. Peer interaction as children and teenagers plays a far more important role in adulthood than originally thought. There are many different types of bullying and no matter how it materializes, the results are the same; extremely damaging. In our next blog we’ll be talking about those different types of bullying and what they look like. Talk to you soon and stay tuned in...